Is Daily Glass of Wine Really Good for You? Myths and Reality

Over the past year, our social media feeds have blown up on more than one occasion overclaims that drinking wine at bedtime could help you drop a few pounds. In fact, this “news” generated so much buzz that urban-legend buster Snopes decided to investigate. Turns out, the majority of coverage was referencing a Daily Mail story that hinged on anecdotal accounts of women claiming that their “nighttime tipple” helped them slim down. But sadly, there was no new groundbreaking report showing that a glass of red before bed was the secret new weight loss weapon we’ve all been dreaming of. So what gives?

We’ve been told over and over that alcohol has no place in a weight loss program. Not only does it provide empty calories, studies confirm that “having a few” tends to zap your inhibition and make you order midnight cheese fries — a phenomenon known as the “drunchies.” Alas, it makes sense to file away the “bedtime wine” idea in the “too good to be true” health research morgue that also houses this seductive headline: “A glass of red wine is the equivalent to an hour at the gym.” Remember that one?

Yet research shows that moderate amounts of Malbec won’t totally derail your weight loss efforts. Here’s what you need to know about your vino habit.

RELATED: How Bad Is Alcohol, Really? 6 Crazy Facts

The Case for Pre-Snooze Booze

We’ve all read that red wine is a healthy part of the Mediterranean Diet — the one that helps you live longer and maintain an enviable BMI. Even lifestyle guru Tim Ferris claimsthat two glasses of wine before bed each night helped him achieve his ripped physique. And recent research in mice showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant in red wine, can help turn regular white fat into energy-burning beige fat, which can contribute to weight loss and prevent obesity (just in case you didn’t know that fat came in different colors).

“Heavy drinking can disturb sleep, but a moderate amount has a sedative effect.”

While you can also get resveratrol in fruits, such as blueberries, lead author Min Du, PhD, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University, explains that the fermentation process of wine makes the antioxidant compounds easier to absorb, which can help accelerate the fat-burning process. Although Du didn’t specifically test the effect of giving resveratrol to the mice at night, he concedes that there might be a metabolic advantageof consuming wine in the wee hours.

When you drink wine with food — whether at lunch, dinner or with a late-night snack — the antioxidant compounds interact with protein in a way that prevents the body from metabolizing them for weight loss. When you consume resveratrol on its own, however, the body is able to absorb the compounds more readily, and thus maximize the burning of beige fat. That said, he stops short of endorsing an unaccompanied glass of bedtime wine as a diet strategy. “I don’t have the data to support it,” he says. “Wine is beneficial to your health, but never use it to control your body weight. It still has calories.” Ahem, 110 to 130 calories per glass, on average.

RELATED: Here’s How Many Calories Are in Your Cocktail 

There’s another way wine might help with weight control. Just the right amount can help people fall asleep more easily, and according to recent studies, adequate slumber is key to keeping off the pounds. “Heavy drinking can disturb sleep, but a moderate amount has a sedative effect,” explains Greg Traversy, a researcher at the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group in Ottawa, Canada who wrote a review paper on research involving alcohol and obesity. “If it’s helping you sleep, then maybe you’re getting the weight management benefits downstream by having more energy to be active and not having the snack munchies the next day,” Traversy says.

Alcohol and Weight Loss: When Wine Backfires

“It’s like it has a special VIP pass to go ahead of other fuels.”

Unfortunately, much to the disappointment of weight-conscious wine lovers everywhere, Traversy didn’t find any studies showing that imbibing will help you shed pounds. Yet he was surprised to find evidence that moderate drinking wasn’t necessarily linked with weight gain. Take this famous Harvardstudy, for example. The research, which was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in 2010, found that women who drank in moderation (defined as one to two glasses daily) had a lower risk of becoming overweight over 13 years than women who didn’t drink at all. “It’s not clear why,” he says. “It might be because they’re exhibiting moderate behaviors in all areas of life, including weight maintenance.” The study authors pointed out that the moderate drinkers exercised more and ate less food to make room for their alcohol calories.

RELATED: How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? This Alcohol Calculator Tells You

The bad news is that if you drink too much, alcohol interferes with your body’s ability to burn fat. “Alcohol blocks the burning of everything else,” says Marc Hellerstein, MD, PhD, professor of human nutrition at the University of California at Berkeley. “It’s like it has a special VIP pass to go ahead of other fuels.” In other words, if your body is overwhelmed with burning alcohol, your food will be more likely to get stored as fat.

Perhaps this was the secret of late-night wine. By drinking it a few hours after dinner, you give your body a chance to digest it when it won’t have to compete with food. “I’m not convinced,” says Hellerstein. “You’ll burn the alcohol, but not fat.” The bottom line: Pick your wine or weight loss.

According to Our Readers These are The Best Places to Travel for Food

11 Neighborhood Restaurants In Kentucky, With Food So Good You’ll Be Back For Seconds

Sometimes you find the very best food at those neighborhood restaurants in Kentucky. The restaurants that may not look like much from the outside, but inside they have friendly staff and cooks that have mastered their craft. These places have been preparing the same food for years… and making it unbelievably delicious.

These are some of the best places to grab a bite to eat, according to our reader comments. If you love the neighborhood restaurants in Kentucky you might want to check out some of the Mom n Pop diners we’ve covered too!

Is Coffee Good for You? What It Does to Your Body and Brain

 

 

Colleges and universities are back in session. That means millions of students nationwide are going to be reaching for their favorite study-time stimulant and morning eye-opener. (And no, it’s not Adderall.)

Coffee is still king of the late-night cram session and early morning course schedule. Of course, the drink helps you feel lucid and sharp. (More on that in a minute.) But coffee’s effects on your brain don’t end there. From your memory to your mood, coffee canoodles with your brain and its chemicals in interesting ways.

RELATED: 10 Surprising Facts About Caffeine

How Coffee Perks You Up
Everyone knows caffeine is the stuff in your coffee that keeps you awake and alert—at least for a while. How does it work? It plugs neurochemical receptors in your brain that would normally light up in response to the types of hormones that make you feel tired, shows a study from the U.S. and Italy.

At the same time, by plugging those sleep-triggering receptors, caffeine allows energizing brain chemicals like glutamate and dopamine to circulate more freely. When you feel a buzz from your triple espresso, it’s those two chemicals—not caffeine—that are amping you up, research shows. So think of caffeine as the DJ at a wild party; it’s hanging out off to the side of things and keeping the party going so your brain’s good-time chemicals can rock out.

Coffee, Your Memory, and More
A study from Johns Hopkins University found swallowing the amount of caffeine in one or two cups of coffee boosts a person’s memory for new information by roughly 10 percent. How? Probably in the same ways caffeine keeps you awake and sharp, explains Michael Yassa, Ph.D., co-author of the Johns Hopkins study. Yassa says caffeine might help ramp up the activity of those brain chemicals involved in memory storage.

There’s also some evidence that coffee may strengthen the sense-based information your brain collects. Many studies dating back to the 1970s have found that the amount of caffeine in one to four cups of coffee can heighten your brain’s sensitivity to light and color, as well as sound. This may contribute to caffeine’s memory boosting abilities, the studies hint. (If you’re brain is better at absorbing sensory info, your memories will be sharper, the data suggest.)

Dozens and dozens of research papers have also tied coffee and caffeine to improved decision making, focus, quicker information recall, longer and sharper attention span, and many more brain benefits. Some newer research has even linked coffee consumption to lower rates of age-related brain diseases like dementia.

Coffee and Your Mood
Coffee may help ward off the blues (the serious kind linked to depression). Several research papers have shown the caffeine in coffee may increase the amount and activity of the brain chemical serotonin. Low levels of serotonin have been linked to depression. And this serotonin boost may help explain why a study from the U.K. found people who drink coffee in the morning feel friendlier, happier, and more content.

On the other hand, too much caffeine can heighten your feelings of tension and anxiety, shows a study from Singapore. It can alsocrank up your stress levels if you’re already feeling frazzled. “Too much” depends on how much caffeine your system is used to dealing with, the authors say. So if you’re a two-cup-a-day person, you’d probably have to drink double that amount to feel these negative mood effects. At the same time, if you don’t drink much coffee, smaller doses of caffeine could trigger anxious feelings, the authors say.

 

 

brain-on-coffee-700_0

The Bad News
Multiple studies have shown caffeine is both habit- and tolerance-forming. That means if your brain gets used to your drinking coffee, you may not be able to think clearly or feel sharp if you abandon your brew. You may also have to drink more and more coffee to feel like yourself, research suggests. But the good news? For most people, there are few downsides to drinking up to 24 ounces of coffee a day, concludes a massive review study from Oregon State University.

 

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The Most Successful Techniques for Rising Early

just-wake-up-early

Waking early is one of my favorite things in the world. The morning is quiet as the world hasn’t begun stirring, the perfect time for meditation, writing, exercise and some quiet reading.

Waking early can give you an hour or three of extra time for focus and creativity. While you could do those things later in the day, most people don’t (with exceptions of course).

I haven’t written about waking early for awhile, mostly because my waking time is in constant flux. Some months I enjoy rising with the sun, other times I’ll get up early on purpose for awhile and enjoy the extra quiet time.

I’ve learned a thing or two about how to change your wake-up time with joy, and today I’ll share the most successful techniques in my many experimentations.

The Gradual Method

The best method for changing the time you wake up is to do it gradually — 10-15 minutes earlier for 2-4 days, until you feel used to it, and then repeat. If you get up at 8 a.m. normally, don’t suddenly change it to 6 a.m. Try 7:45 a.m. first.

That might seem too slow to most people, and you’re free to disregard this advice. However, in my many experimentations, the most enjoyable and long-lasting change in sleeping schedules have been slow and gradual.

Sudden changes of an hour earlier or more in your waking time are difficult, and not likely to last. If you get up 1-2 hours earlier, on Day 1, then you’ll have a tough time, and not enjoy it. The next day, you’ll have a big sleep deficit, and it’ll be even tougher (assuming you’re able to do it 2 days in a row). Day 3 is even harder. Eventually you either make it through the tough times (it’ll take at least a week of suffering), or you crash and sleep in late and have to start over or you give up.

Sleeping patterns are difficult to change, and so the gradual method works much better. This is true, by the way, of eating habits, exercise habits, clutter habits and more.

3 Steps to Actually Get Up

So you’ve set your alarm for 10-15 minutes earlier than normal, and maybe got through the first few days, then set it another 10-15 minutes earlier, and soon you’re at 30-45 minutes earlier than usual … but now you have the tendency to hit the snooze alarm and stay in bed (sometimes awake) without getting up.

Here’s how to beat that in 3 steps:

  1. Get excited. The night before, think of one thing you’d like to do in the morning that excites you. It could be something you want to write, or a new yoga routine, or meditation, or something you’d like to read, or a work project that’s got you fired up. In the morning, when you wake up, remember that exciting thing, and that will help motivate you to get up.
  2. Jump out of bed. Yes, jump out of bed. With enthusiasm. Jump up and spread your arms wide as if to say, “Yes! I am alive! Ready to tackle the day with open arms and the gusto of a driven maniac.” Seriously, it works.
  3. Put your alarm across the room. If it’s right next to you, you’ll hit the snooze button. So put it on the other side of the room, so you’ll have to get up (or jump up) to turn it off. Then, get into the habit of going straight to the bathroom to pee once you’ve turned it off. Once you’re done peeing, you’re much less likely to go back to bed. At this point, remember your exciting thing. If you didn’t jump out of bed, at least stretch your arms wide and greet the day.

What to Do When You Get Up

First, things not to do with your newfound early-morning time: don’t check email, news, social media, blogs. Don’t waste this new time doing the same thing you always do.

Here are some other things that are better, in my experience:

  1. Drink a glass of water. You’re dehydrated from not drinking any water all night. Drink a full glass of water if you can. It’ll make you feel more awake.
  2. Meditate. Even just for 3 minutes. It’s such a great way to start your day — doing nothing, just sitting, and practicing mindful focus.
  3. Write. Or do some other kind of creating.
  4. Exercise. Go for a walk or a run, or do a home workout. Even just 10 minutes.
  5. Enjoy a cup of coffee or tea. Either one of these makes the morning better.

Sleeping Earlier

You can’t just wake up earlier and not sleep earlier. You’ll eventually crash. So here are some tips for getting to sleep earlier:

  1. Set a bedtime of 7-8.5 hours before you want to wake up. So if you’re waking up at 6 a.m., go to bed between 9:30-11 p.m. Where you are in that time frame depends on how much sleep you need. Most people need about 7.5-8 hours of sleep, though there are lots of variations. I tend to get about 7, but also take a short nap in the afternoons.
  2. Create a bedtime ritual. I like to set up the coffeemaker and clean up a little (it’s nice to wake up to a clean house), then floss & brush my teeth and do a flouride rinse. Then I read myself to sleep.
  3. No computers in bed. That means no laptop, no tablets, no mobile phones. Kindles are OK except the Kindle Fire, which is the same as an iPad. No TV either. Just reading.
  4. Exercise helps a lot earlier in the day. It gets your body nice and tired, so you’ll sleep better. Don’t exercise an hour or less before bed, or you’ll be pumped up. I like a glass of red wine in the evening — it helps relax me and I tend to sleep a bit easier.
  5. Try this method if you have trouble sleeping: close your eyes and get comfortable, then think of the first thing you did that morning — the very first thing, like turning off your alarm. Then think of the next thing, and so on, replaying your morning in as much detail as possible. I never get to mid-morning.

Common Problems

Here are some of the most common problems in my experience and from readers’ questions:

  • Super tired in the morning: If you wake early and just can’t seem to function, that’s fairly normal. My solution is water, move around a lot, and drink a bit of coffee or matcha (powdered greeen tea). I will sometimes take a nap in the afternoon if I’m really tired. Also, it might be a sign that you’re moving too quickly — make sure you’re waking just a little earlier, and stay at one time for a few days until you feel adjusted before setting the alarm a little earlier.
  • Missing out on spouse time: If you are used to spending the evening with your spouse, and going to bed early means you’re missing out on that time, you have a few options. One is to see if your spouse is willing to try getting up early with you, perhaps to meditate or exercise together, or just to have coffee together. That can be really nice. Another is to cut out that together time in the late evening, but find time during the day (if possible), or at least in the early evening and weekends. Finally, you could decide that the together time is too important, and not get up earlier — or compromise and keep most of the evening together time, but wake just 30 minutes earlier.
  • You’re not a morning person: Some people think this but just haven’t given it a try — or they’ve gotten up an hour or two earlier all at once, and hated being so tired. This is why the gradual method is so important — it’s not that you’re not a morning person, it’s just that you tried to change too quickly and are suffering. But finally, it’s true that some people just are better focusing late at night (I have some friends like this) and morning isn’t their thing — and that’s perfectly alright. There’s no need to conform to what others do. I just shared this to show what works for me.

 

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How To Keep Your Brain Active: Top Tips You Can Do On Your Lunch Break

The nine-to-five has a habit of taking its toll on our bodies. If you often find you’re sat down all day and feel brain-fried when it’s only Tuesday, it’s time to change your behavior.

I spoke to nutritional therapist Naomi Mead about how to make a difference to your brain health through simple everyday steps.

So, here are some ways you can boost your brainpower on your well-earned lunch break. Take a look at her top tips and let us know if you have any of your own.

Go for a Walk

Enjoying a brisk walk on your lunch break is pretty easy to accomplish, it’s free and all you have to do is step outside and move your legs around. Walking’s good for your mental and physical health, too. Regular exercise has been proven to:

  • Reduce stress
  • Decrease feelings of anxiety and depression
  • Aid concentration
  • Improve memory and cognitive function
  • Aid sleep

So structuring your day around regular activity will help to keep you happy and healthy. This infographicby gaming experts Wink Bingo shows that 150 minutes of exercise each week (so just half-an-hour every weekday) can have a major impact on your brain, boosting your:

  • Verbal memory
  • Learning
  • Emotions

The research also shows that exercise can boost your creativity by as much as 60 percent, so you may find yourself rushing back to the office, flush with new ideas. “Physical activity can be thought of like a fertilizer for the brain, nourishing it to work more efficiently,” said Mead. “Just half an hour of brisk walking can help to provide these benefits.”

Related Article: Just Breathe: Utilizing the Power of Mindfulness to Achieve Peace in Business

Learn Something New

Is there something you’ve always wanted to learn? If it’s something like getting to grips with a new language, brushing up on the history of Western philosophy or doing an online course, you could probably fit in a little time into your working day to focus on it. Learning something new is a form of mental exercise and is believed to maintain brain cells and stimulate communication between them. So, take up a hobby or embrace a new skill, and get those synapses firing.

Eat Smart

If your lunch-of-choice is a supermarket meal deal, think again. It’s much easier than you’d expect to switch to something better. Consider cooking up some bespoke brain food the night before, or take a look at the healthy treats you can discover locally. Our brains need to be kept healthy, just like our lungs, muscles and everything else, so keep your cranium tip-top with some healthy lunches. The following foods are thought to be important in boosting brainpower:

  • Tomatoes – the fruit contains lycopene, which is thought to protect against damage to brain cells.
  • Broccoli – the green vegetable is packed full of vitamin K, which can improve brainpower and cognition.
  • Oily fish like salmon, mackerel and sardines – these contain omega 3 fats, known to be good for the brain and memory.

A Mediterranean menu is commonly regarded as being excellent for both the body and the brain. “The traditional Mediterranean diet is high in olive oil, fruit, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains, with moderate amounts of fish, poultry, eggs and dairy, and low amounts of red meat, processed foods and sugar,” outlines Mead.

Related Article: Motivation First: The Steps to Building a Mindful Company Culture

Finding ways to snack and graze on these smarter food groups throughout the day can keep hunger at bay and keep you fuelled for efficiency. And this diet option is something that can be harnessed positively as part of your office culture.

“The Mediterranean diet is considered a whole lifestyle approach,” says Naomi, “with an emphasis also on the importance of the social side and enjoyment of eating.” Bringing your team together for a Mediterranean lunch now and again will boost productivity and contribute to a happier work environment.

Do a Sudoku

The number puzzle game is extremely popular and easy to do. You can play for free online, or pick up one of those cheap Sudoku books you see in your local bookstore. But can Sudoku and other popular puzzle games really boost your brain during your cherished work downtime?

They’re certainly known to be good for problem-solving and are probably more enriching than readingMail Online, “Evidence is accumulating that these activities not only improve the skills they are designed to help but are likely to have some long-lasting benefits on cognition too,” says Mead.

Related Article: 7 Simple Mindful Tactics to Reduce Stress for Leaders

Meditate

Use your lunch break to take a trip to a local park, green space or specialist studio for a spot of meditation. Yoga, and the wider practice of mindfulness are simple enough to learn and, according tothis infographic, increase memory and improve attention, as well as increasing overall wellbeing. The benefits are significant to both your working and personal life.

As Naomi suggests, “meditating regularly can actually change the structure of the brain, and specifically has been shown to increase the amount of gray matter in the brain.” Gray matter is the tissue associated with dealing with stress, emotional stability and intelligence, and studies have shown that it can take as little as eight weeks for meditation to have an impact.

10 Things People Often Misunderstand About Losing Weight

 

If only figuring out how to lose weight were an open and shut case. But if slimming down happens to be a goal of yours, you may have experienced the struggle of parsing through conflicting weight-loss advice. Should you go high-protein or high-fat? Cut the dairy, or make Greek yogurt a snacking staple? Here, experts explain the truth behind 10 popular misguided pieces of weight-loss information.

1. Myth: carbs will make you gain pounds, period.

Some people equate carbohydrates with weight gain because they bind water and can lead tobloating. You’re not truly getting bigger, but it can sure feel like it. The other reason people may see carbs as a nutritional adversary is because they can be so easy to overeat, which actually can lead to added pounds. To avoid that sneaky trap, fill your diet with complex carbohydrates like vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. “They often contain fiber and many vitamins and minerals, unlike simple carbohydrates found in white rice, refined sugar, sodas, and candy,” Ashvini Mashru, R.D., author of Small Steps to Slim, and owner of Wellness Nutrition Concepts LLC, tells SELF.

2. Myth: indulging is off-limits.

The fact is that humans have increasingly long lifespans. Can you honestly imagine never touching your favorite food again for decades? It’s just not sustainable, which is why experts don’t advocate swearing off your most-loved treats altogether. “I strongly believe through personal and professional experience that all foods can fit into a healthy diet,” Samantha Finkelstein, R.D., founder of Nerdy Girl Nutrition, tells SELF. “If you’re really hungry for something, sit down with it, savor it, enjoy it, and move on.” Basically, go ahead and dive into that dessert, girl.

3. Myth: going gluten-free is clutch for dropping pounds.

If you don’t have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, adopting a gluten-free diet probably won’t do much in the way of lasting weight loss. You might see a change in the beginning because you’ll cut back on things like pasta, bagels, and pizza, but it’s likely not sustainable. “Over time, most people find ways to reintroduce these calories into their diets by way of ‘gluten-free’ products,” says Mashru. Those foods have what experts call a “health halo,” meaning they seem healthier than they really are thanks to a few well-placed buzzwords.

4. Myth: the number on the scale is the best marker of health.

So not true! “Weight may be one way your doctor or dietitian lets you know if you’re at risk for certain lifestyle-associated diseases, but even then it’s not always the most reliable indicator,” says Finkelstein. Someone who’s technically outside of the “normal” range weight-wise but has healthy habits can be less at risk for things like heart disease than someone in the “normal” weight range who doesn’t eat well or exercise.

5. Myth: low-fat and fat-free foods are automatically better for you.

“Many processed low-fat or fat-free foods have just as many calories as the full-fat versions, or even more,” says Mashru. To compensate for the loss of flavor and texture that occurs when you take away fat, they may also have added sugar, flour, salt, or other additives. “Read the nutrition facts on a food package to find out how many calories are in a serving, and also check the serving size to see if it’s less than you’re used to eating,” says Mashru.

6. Myth: exercise needs to be hardcore to count.

Working out comes in many forms, and not all of them will leave you breathless and drenched in sweat. “Exercise doesn’t have to be spending an hour at the gym. Just get moving,” says Finkelstein. “Take a dance class, go for a hike, walk the dog, or vacuum your house. It all counts!” So, yes, those late-night solo dance parties where you pretend you’re Beyoncé are well worth it.

7. Myth: there’s nothing wrong with cutting out entire food groups or nutrients.

While some people have issues like lactose intolerance that require eliminating food groups or nutrients, most people don’t need to go to those lengths. “A healthy diet is marked by variety, balance, and moderation,” says Finkelstein. “Your body requires fat, protein, and carbohydrates to function. Removing one of these components may lead to nutrient deficiencies, and may even hinder weight loss, as your body lacks what it needs.”

8. Myth: skipping meals is a great way to lose weight.

Eating less equals less calories, which equals weight loss, right? Even though that seems logical, that’s generally not how the human body works. “People who skip meals tend to feel hungrier later on and eat more than they normally would,” says Mashru. She recommends eating small meals throughout the day to keep your energy up, maintain stable blood sugar levels, and stay satiated so you don’t make impulsive food choices.

9. Myth: artificial sweeteners are the brilliant answer to your sugar cravings.

A healthy sugar substitute for zero calories sounds too good to be true, so of course it is. “A sugar craving is a biochemical reaction, and it turns out your brain can tell the difference between real sugar and the fake stuff even when your taste buds can’t,” says Finkelstein. So when you try to tame a nagging sweet tooth with artificial sweeteners, you might actually eat more of the treat because your craving isn’t getting satisfied. “It’s also important to remember that just because something is sweetened with artificial sweeteners doesn’t mean it’s calorie-free,” says Finkelstein.

10. Myth: you can eat whatever as long as you exercise.

It’s all about balance. “You can’t out-exercise a bad diet, and you can’t out-diet a lack of exercise,” says Finkelstein. “Maintaining a healthy body is about leading a healthy lifestyle that is fed by real food and prioritizes physical activity.” Refer back to number three and remember: that includes room for indulging!

Photo Credit: Jordan Siemens

 

12-genius-gadgets-for-people-who-love-food

Who doesn’t love to eat? And when you love to eat, you know you love to eat, right? You can’t simply just like to eat, that’s impossible. Did you know, though, that there’s a way to make your eating experience a lot better than it already was before? How, you ask? Well, with a few simple and ingenious gadgets, eating will become easier, better and sometimes even more on-the-go! The Go Plate is my absolute favorite as I always seem to have trouble balancing both, a sky-high plate and a glass of juice. Here are 12 genius kitchen gadgets for us foodies (you know you want them):

1. Compartment Cutting Board

This cutting board makes meal preparation so much easier! You can cut up all your vegetables in advance and slide them into drawers hidden underneath the board for an easy storage solution.
12 Genius Gadgets For People Who Love Food
via Quirky
12 Genius Gadgets For People Who Love Food
via Quirky

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2. The Go Plate

As I said before, this is my ultimate favorite. This allows you to carry your favorite drink and your plate at the same time. It’s the most perfect invention for lazy people who don’t want to get up again!
12 Genius Gadgets For People Who Love Food
via Amazon
3. Avocado Cuber

As much as this is a ridiculous gadget, it’s also pretty genius! If you eat a lot of avocados, this saves you so much time on the cutting!
12 Genius Gadgets For People Who Love Food
via Williams Sonoma
4. Pineapple Cutter

This makes eating pineapple so much easier!
12 Genius Gadgets For People Who Love Food
via Amazon

Is It Really Expensive to Eat Healthy?

“Care for, nourish, and love your body. It’s yours for life. ~Margaret Marshall

It’s expensive to eat, but it is more cost effective to choose your food wisely.

Your eating affects everything from your health to your level of success. What you choose to eat can dictate moods, relationships, and lifestyle. So why do people complain about the cost of healthier, nutritious, options?

In my years of presenting training or seminars and workshops, and working with my clients, this question or comment always arises: “Why is the price of lettuce so high, and have you seen the price of tomatoes, bananas, etc?” I grocery, shop too. I see the prices and I make choices from available food items. But as I walk through the grocery store I also notice others’ shopping carts. Some carts are loaded with cookies and sugary boxes of cereal. The carts hold ice cream, boxed cakes, individual drink pouches, or chips. I watch people walk up and down an aisle just grabbing items from the shelf. I’ll also see others who can barely walk, due to their size, filling their carts with this type of food, and I think…those poor eating patterns are just too expensive, in so many ways:

    1. Eating and drinking food that is loaded with sugar and artificial sweeteners will cause you to eat more. You’ll continue to eat because this food does not nourish you. Not only are you paying the high sticker price on these items, but because you eat large quantities you purchase them more frequently. Much of the high priced, so called diet food also contain artificial sweeteners, leading you to eat more.
  • Eating high-priced, processed, or sugary food can cause a multitude of illnessesleading to time off from work, or costly health care bills.
  1. Eating these food items add excess weight. As you pack on the pounds you could retreat from an active life, sever relationships, and never achieve your full potential, resulting in lost income.

You may say, “This sounds extreme,” or “This is not me,” but I’ve watched this happen to others. There are no guaranties in life, but while we’re here, why not be the healthiest we can be? If that means you pay a higher price for lettuce or tomatoes at certain times of the year, then that’s what you do.

My definition of healthy eating, as stated in Body, Mind, & Mouth…Life’s Eating Connection is: “Eating food that is enjoyable to you, in the quantity that is good for you.” This means the fruit and vegetables you find enjoyable can be eaten in a larger quantity than the chocolate cake you find enjoyable that should be eaten in a much smaller quantity. It means that you don’t deprive yourself but you learn to make choices congruent with your desired results. It also means your grocery cart is full of the food that nourishes you, and less or none of the food with no nourishment. In the grand scheme, it cost you less.

  1. When you eat food that is nourishing, you eat less because you are giving your body the nutrients it requires and you are satisfied with smaller portions.
  2. When you eat smaller portions, you eat less, and need to purchase less.
  3. The cravings for sugary items will subside and there will not be a need to purchase them often.
  4. You’ll find you have more energy and stamina to fulfill your daily tasks and reach your full potential.
  5. You may even find you can live medication-free, saving money at the pharmacy.

This list can go on, and I’m sure you can add to it. I would ask you to. The more you realize that choosing your food wisely is preventive medicine, the healthier you can be.

If the price of fresh, nutritious food in your grocery store upsets you, learn to shop seasonally. I ask my clients to shop for what’s in season in their part of the country. Those items will have a lesser price tag, and be fresher than items being shipped a long distance.

In conclusion, when I am asked by an attendee at my seminars or workshops, “Why is the price of lettuce so high?” I have to respond with, “What is the price of your favorite box of cookies?” What’s amazing is, the answer is always, “I don’t know.” Funny how people can complain about the price of lettuce, yet have no idea about the sticker price on other items, nor have they considered the long term effects of these items, and the cost of an unhealthy lifestyle.

“Care for, nourish, and love your body. It’s yours for life. ~Margaret Marshall

It’s expensive to eat, but it is more cost effective to choose your food wisely.

Your eating affects everything from your health to your level of success. What you choose to eat can dictate moods, relationships, and lifestyle. So why do people complain about the cost of healthier, nutritious, options?

In my years of presenting training or seminars and workshops, and working with my clients, this question or comment always arises: “Why is the price of lettuce so high, and have you seen the price of tomatoes, bananas, etc?” I grocery, shop too. I see the prices and I make choices from available food items. But as I walk through the grocery store I also notice others’ shopping carts. Some carts are loaded with cookies and sugary boxes of cereal. The carts hold ice cream, boxed cakes, individual drink pouches, or chips. I watch people walk up and down an aisle just grabbing items from the shelf. I’ll also see others who can barely walk, due to their size, filling their carts with this type of food, and I think…those poor eating patterns are just too expensive, in so many ways:

    1. Eating and drinking food that is loaded with sugar and artificial sweeteners will cause you to eat more. You’ll continue to eat because this food does not nourish you. Not only are you paying the high sticker price on these items, but because you eat large quantities you purchase them more frequently. Much of the high priced, so called diet food also contain artificial sweeteners, leading you to eat more.
  • Eating high-priced, processed, or sugary food can cause a multitude of illnessesleading to time off from work, or costly health care bills.
  1. Eating these food items add excess weight. As you pack on the pounds you could retreat from an active life, sever relationships, and never achieve your full potential, resulting in lost income.

You may say, “This sounds extreme,” or “This is not me,” but I’ve watched this happen to others. There are no guaranties in life, but while we’re here, why not be the healthiest we can be? If that means you pay a higher price for lettuce or tomatoes at certain times of the year, then that’s what you do.

My definition of healthy eating, as stated in Body, Mind, & Mouth…Life’s Eating Connection is: “Eating food that is enjoyable to you, in the quantity that is good for you.” This means the fruit and vegetables you find enjoyable can be eaten in a larger quantity than the chocolate cake you find enjoyable that should be eaten in a much smaller quantity. It means that you don’t deprive yourself but you learn to make choices congruent with your desired results. It also means your grocery cart is full of the food that nourishes you, and less or none of the food with no nourishment. In the grand scheme, it cost you less.

  1. When you eat food that is nourishing, you eat less because you are giving your body the nutrients it requires and you are satisfied with smaller portions.
  2. When you eat smaller portions, you eat less, and need to purchase less.
  3. The cravings for sugary items will subside and there will not be a need to purchase them often.
  4. You’ll find you have more energy and stamina to fulfill your daily tasks and reach your full potential.
  5. You may even find you can live medication-free, saving money at the pharmacy.

This list can go on, and I’m sure you can add to it. I would ask you to. The more you realize that choosing your food wisely is preventive medicine, the healthier you can be.

If the price of fresh, nutritious food in your grocery store upsets you, learn to shop seasonally. I ask my clients to shop for what’s in season in their part of the country. Those items will have a lesser price tag, and be fresher than items being shipped a long distance.

In conclusion, when I am asked by an attendee at my seminars or workshops, “Why is the price of lettuce so high?” I have to respond with, “What is the price of your favorite box of cookies?” What’s amazing is, the answer is always, “I don’t know.” Funny how people can complain about the price of lettuce, yet have no idea about the sticker price on other items, nor have they considered the long term effects of these items, and the cost of an unhealthy lifestyle.

“Care for, nourish, and love your body. It’s yours for life. ~Margaret Marshall

It’s expensive to eat, but it is more cost effective to choose your food wisely.

Your eating affects everything from your health to your level of success. What you choose to eat can dictate moods, relationships, and lifestyle. So why do people complain about the cost of healthier, nutritious, options?

In my years of presenting training or seminars and workshops, and working with my clients, this question or comment always arises: “Why is the price of lettuce so high, and have you seen the price of tomatoes, bananas, etc?” I grocery, shop too. I see the prices and I make choices from available food items. But as I walk through the grocery store I also notice others’ shopping carts. Some carts are loaded with cookies and sugary boxes of cereal. The carts hold ice cream, boxed cakes, individual drink pouches, or chips. I watch people walk up and down an aisle just grabbing items from the shelf. I’ll also see others who can barely walk, due to their size, filling their carts with this type of food, and I think…those poor eating patterns are just too expensive, in so many ways:

    1. Eating and drinking food that is loaded with sugar and artificial sweeteners will cause you to eat more. You’ll continue to eat because this food does not nourish you. Not only are you paying the high sticker price on these items, but because you eat large quantities you purchase them more frequently. Much of the high priced, so called diet food also contain artificial sweeteners, leading you to eat more.
  • Eating high-priced, processed, or sugary food can cause a multitude of illnessesleading to time off from work, or costly health care bills.
  1. Eating these food items add excess weight. As you pack on the pounds you could retreat from an active life, sever relationships, and never achieve your full potential, resulting in lost income.

You may say, “This sounds extreme,” or “This is not me,” but I’ve watched this happen to others. There are no guaranties in life, but while we’re here, why not be the healthiest we can be? If that means you pay a higher price for lettuce or tomatoes at certain times of the year, then that’s what you do.

My definition of healthy eating, as stated in Body, Mind, & Mouth…Life’s Eating Connection is: “Eating food that is enjoyable to you, in the quantity that is good for you.” This means the fruit and vegetables you find enjoyable can be eaten in a larger quantity than the chocolate cake you find enjoyable that should be eaten in a much smaller quantity. It means that you don’t deprive yourself but you learn to make choices congruent with your desired results. It also means your grocery cart is full of the food that nourishes you, and less or none of the food with no nourishment. In the grand scheme, it cost you less.

  1. When you eat food that is nourishing, you eat less because you are giving your body the nutrients it requires and you are satisfied with smaller portions.
  2. When you eat smaller portions, you eat less, and need to purchase less.
  3. The cravings for sugary items will subside and there will not be a need to purchase them often.
  4. You’ll find you have more energy and stamina to fulfill your daily tasks and reach your full potential.
  5. You may even find you can live medication-free, saving money at the pharmacy.

This list can go on, and I’m sure you can add to it. I would ask you to. The more you realize that choosing your food wisely is preventive medicine, the healthier you can be.

If the price of fresh, nutritious food in your grocery store upsets you, learn to shop seasonally. I ask my clients to shop for what’s in season in their part of the country. Those items will have a lesser price tag, and be fresher than items being shipped a long distance.

In conclusion, when I am asked by an attendee at my seminars or workshops, “Why is the price of lettuce so high?” I have to respond with, “What is the price of your favorite box of cookies?” What’s amazing is, the answer is always, “I don’t know.” Funny how people can complain about the price of lettuce, yet have no idea about the sticker price on other items, nor have they considered the long term effects of these items, and the cost of an unhealthy lifestyle.

“Care for, nourish, and love your body. It’s yours for life. ~Margaret Marshall

It’s expensive to eat, but it is more cost effective to choose your food wisely.

Your eating affects everything from your health to your level of success. What you choose to eat can dictate moods, relationships, and lifestyle. So why do people complain about the cost of healthier, nutritious, options?

In my years of presenting training or seminars and workshops, and working with my clients, this question or comment always arises: “Why is the price of lettuce so high, and have you seen the price of tomatoes, bananas, etc?” I grocery, shop too. I see the prices and I make choices from available food items. But as I walk through the grocery store I also notice others’ shopping carts. Some carts are loaded with cookies and sugary boxes of cereal. The carts hold ice cream, boxed cakes, individual drink pouches, or chips. I watch people walk up and down an aisle just grabbing items from the shelf. I’ll also see others who can barely walk, due to their size, filling their carts with this type of food, and I think…those poor eating patterns are just too expensive, in so many ways:

    1. Eating and drinking food that is loaded with sugar and artificial sweeteners will cause you to eat more. You’ll continue to eat because this food does not nourish you. Not only are you paying the high sticker price on these items, but because you eat large quantities you purchase them more frequently. Much of the high priced, so called diet food also contain artificial sweeteners, leading you to eat more.
  • Eating high-priced, processed, or sugary food can cause a multitude of illnessesleading to time off from work, or costly health care bills.
  1. Eating these food items add excess weight. As you pack on the pounds you could retreat from an active life, sever relationships, and never achieve your full potential, resulting in lost income.

You may say, “This sounds extreme,” or “This is not me,” but I’ve watched this happen to others. There are no guaranties in life, but while we’re here, why not be the healthiest we can be? If that means you pay a higher price for lettuce or tomatoes at certain times of the year, then that’s what you do.

My definition of healthy eating, as stated in Body, Mind, & Mouth…Life’s Eating Connection is: “Eating food that is enjoyable to you, in the quantity that is good for you.” This means the fruit and vegetables you find enjoyable can be eaten in a larger quantity than the chocolate cake you find enjoyable that should be eaten in a much smaller quantity. It means that you don’t deprive yourself but you learn to make choices congruent with your desired results. It also means your grocery cart is full of the food that nourishes you, and less or none of the food with no nourishment. In the grand scheme, it cost you less.

  1. When you eat food that is nourishing, you eat less because you are giving your body the nutrients it requires and you are satisfied with smaller portions.
  2. When you eat smaller portions, you eat less, and need to purchase less.
  3. The cravings for sugary items will subside and there will not be a need to purchase them often.
  4. You’ll find you have more energy and stamina to fulfill your daily tasks and reach your full potential.
  5. You may even find you can live medication-free, saving money at the pharmacy.

This list can go on, and I’m sure you can add to it. I would ask you to. The more you realize that choosing your food wisely is preventive medicine, the healthier you can be.

If the price of fresh, nutritious food in your grocery store upsets you, learn to shop seasonally. I ask my clients to shop for what’s in season in their part of the country. Those items will have a lesser price tag, and be fresher than items being shipped a long distance.

In conclusion, when I am asked by an attendee at my seminars or workshops, “Why is the price of lettuce so high?” I have to respond with, “What is the price of your favorite box of cookies?” What’s amazing is, the answer is always, “I don’t know.” Funny how people can complain about the price of lettuce, yet have no idea about the sticker price on other items, nor have they considered the long term effects of these items, and the cost of an unhealthy lifestyle.

“Care for, nourish, and love your body. It’s yours for life. ~Margaret Marshall

It’s expensive to eat, but it is more cost effective to choose your food wisely.

Your eating affects everything from your health to your level of success. What you choose to eat can dictate moods, relationships, and lifestyle. So why do people complain about the cost of healthier, nutritious, options?

In my years of presenting training or seminars and workshops, and working with my clients, this question or comment always arises: “Why is the price of lettuce so high, and have you seen the price of tomatoes, bananas, etc?” I grocery, shop too. I see the prices and I make choices from available food items. But as I walk through the grocery store I also notice others’ shopping carts. Some carts are loaded with cookies and sugary boxes of cereal. The carts hold ice cream, boxed cakes, individual drink pouches, or chips. I watch people walk up and down an aisle just grabbing items from the shelf. I’ll also see others who can barely walk, due to their size, filling their carts with this type of food, and I think…those poor eating patterns are just too expensive, in so many ways:

    1. Eating and drinking food that is loaded with sugar and artificial sweeteners will cause you to eat more. You’ll continue to eat because this food does not nourish you. Not only are you paying the high sticker price on these items, but because you eat large quantities you purchase them more frequently. Much of the high priced, so called diet food also contain artificial sweeteners, leading you to eat more.
  • Eating high-priced, processed, or sugary food can cause a multitude of illnessesleading to time off from work, or costly health care bills.
  1. Eating these food items add excess weight. As you pack on the pounds you could retreat from an active life, sever relationships, and never achieve your full potential, resulting in lost income.

You may say, “This sounds extreme,” or “This is not me,” but I’ve watched this happen to others. There are no guaranties in life, but while we’re here, why not be the healthiest we can be? If that means you pay a higher price for lettuce or tomatoes at certain times of the year, then that’s what you do.

My definition of healthy eating, as stated in Body, Mind, & Mouth…Life’s Eating Connection is: “Eating food that is enjoyable to you, in the quantity that is good for you.” This means the fruit and vegetables you find enjoyable can be eaten in a larger quantity than the chocolate cake you find enjoyable that should be eaten in a much smaller quantity. It means that you don’t deprive yourself but you learn to make choices congruent with your desired results. It also means your grocery cart is full of the food that nourishes you, and less or none of the food with no nourishment. In the grand scheme, it cost you less.

  1. When you eat food that is nourishing, you eat less because you are giving your body the nutrients it requires and you are satisfied with smaller portions.
  2. When you eat smaller portions, you eat less, and need to purchase less.
  3. The cravings for sugary items will subside and there will not be a need to purchase them often.
  4. You’ll find you have more energy and stamina to fulfill your daily tasks and reach your full potential.
  5. You may even find you can live medication-free, saving money at the pharmacy.

This list can go on, and I’m sure you can add to it. I would ask you to. The more you realize that choosing your food wisely is preventive medicine, the healthier you can be.

If the price of fresh, nutritious food in your grocery store upsets you, learn to shop seasonally. I ask my clients to shop for what’s in season in their part of the country. Those items will have a lesser price tag, and be fresher than items being shipped a long distance.

In conclusion, when I am asked by an attendee at my seminars or workshops, “Why is the price of lettuce so high?” I have to respond with, “What is the price of your favorite box of cookies?” What’s amazing is, the answer is always, “I don’t know.” Funny how people can complain about the price of lettuce, yet have no idea about the sticker price on other items, nor have they considered the long term effects of these items, and the cost of an unhealthy lifestyle.

Can Wine Before Bed Really Help You Lose Weight?

Can Wine Before Bed Really Help You Lose Weight?

Over the past year, our social media feeds have blown up on more than one occasion overclaims that drinking wine at bedtime could help you drop a few pounds. In fact, this “news” generated so much buzz that urban-legend buster Snopes decided to investigate. Turns out, the majority of coverage was referencing a Daily Mail story that hinged on anecdotal accounts of women claiming that their “nighttime tipple” helped them slim down. But sadly, there was no new groundbreaking report showing that a glass of red before bed was the secret new weight loss weapon we’ve all been dreaming of. So what gives?

We’ve been told over and over that alcohol has no place in a weight loss program. Not only does it provide empty calories, studies confirm that “having a few” tends to zap your inhibition and make you order midnight cheese fries — a phenomenon known as the “drunchies.” Alas, it makes sense to file away the “bedtime wine” idea in the “too good to be true” health research morgue that also houses this seductive headline: “A glass of red wine is the equivalent to an hour at the gym.” Remember that one?

Yet research shows that moderate amounts of Malbec won’t totally derail your weight loss efforts. Here’s what you need to know about your vino habit.

RELATED: How Bad Is Alcohol, Really? 6 Crazy Facts

The Case for Pre-Snooze Booze

We’ve all read that red wine is a healthy part of the Mediterranean Diet — the one that helps you live longer and maintain an enviable BMI. Even lifestyle guru Tim Ferris claimsthat two glasses of wine before bed each night helped him achieve his ripped physique. And recent research in mice showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant in red wine, can help turn regular white fat into energy-burning beige fat, which can contribute to weight loss and prevent obesity (just in case you didn’t know that fat came in different colors).

“Heavy drinking can disturb sleep, but a moderate amount has a sedative effect.”

While you can also get resveratrol in fruits, such as blueberries, lead author Min Du, PhD, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University, explains that the fermentation process of wine makes the antioxidant compounds easier to absorb, which can help accelerate the fat-burning process. Although Du didn’t specifically test the effect of giving resveratrol to the mice at night, he concedes that there might be a metabolic advantageof consuming wine in the wee hours.

When you drink wine with food — whether at lunch, dinner or with a late-night snack — the antioxidant compounds interact with protein in a way that prevents the body from metabolizing them for weight loss. When you consume resveratrol on its own, however, the body is able to absorb the compounds more readily, and thus maximize the burning of beige fat. That said, he stops short of endorsing an unaccompanied glass of bedtime wine as a diet strategy. “I don’t have the data to support it,” he says. “Wine is beneficial to your health, but never use it to control your body weight. It still has calories.” Ahem, 110 to 130 calories per glass, on average.

RELATED: Here’s How Many Calories Are in Your Cocktail 

There’s another way wine might help with weight control. Just the right amount can help people fall asleep more easily, and according to recent studies, adequate slumber is key to keeping off the pounds. “Heavy drinking can disturb sleep, but a moderate amount has a sedative effect,” explains Greg Traversy, a researcher at the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group in Ottawa, Canada who wrote a review paper on research involving alcohol and obesity. “If it’s helping you sleep, then maybe you’re getting the weight management benefits downstream by having more energy to be active and not having the snack munchies the next day,” Traversy says.

Alcohol and Weight Loss: When Wine Backfires

“It’s like it has a special VIP pass to go ahead of other fuels.”

Unfortunately, much to the disappointment of weight-conscious wine lovers everywhere, Traversy didn’t find any studies showing that imbibing will help you shed pounds. Yet he was surprised to find evidence that moderate drinking wasn’t necessarily linked with weight gain. Take this famous Harvardstudy, for example. The research, which was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in 2010, found that women who drank in moderation (defined as one to two glasses daily) had a lower risk of becoming overweight over 13 years than women who didn’t drink at all. “It’s not clear why,” he says. “It might be because they’re exhibiting moderate behaviors in all areas of life, including weight maintenance.” The study authors pointed out that the moderate drinkers exercised more and ate less food to make room for their alcohol calories.

RELATED: How Bad Is Your Happy Hour? This Alcohol Calculator Tells You

The bad news is that if you drink too much, alcohol interferes with your body’s ability to burn fat. “Alcohol blocks the burning of everything else,” says Marc Hellerstein, MD, PhD, professor of human nutrition at the University of California at Berkeley. “It’s like it has a special VIP pass to go ahead of other fuels.” In other words, if your body is overwhelmed with burning alcohol, your food will be more likely to get stored as fat.

Perhaps this was the secret of late-night wine. By drinking it a few hours after dinner, you give your body a chance to digest it when it won’t have to compete with food. “I’m not convinced,” says Hellerstein. “You’ll burn the alcohol, but not fat.” The bottom line: Pick your wine or weight loss.